[Nutanix] Mass Deployment of Windows 2016 on AHV using Sysprep, AnswerFile and Powershell

In the past, I have created detailed posts on Sysprep and answer files to deploy customized Image of Windows 2012 R2 which also can be used to Mass Deploy Windows OS. Please have a look here and here. I’m quite grateful to achieve automation of that level. It is nearly six month back post. In the recent project, I was asked to build a template (The way we do in VMware) and use user inputs to deploy Windows Server 2016 to mass deploy it. Not a difficult task to achieve if you are willing to focus. In olden days there was saying “Where there is a will, there is way” Now it is

Where there is a will, there is a skill “

Well, this post is going to be bit detailed. I have created two parts to this post. The first part, I will be focusing on creating the answer file. But didn’t I taught you how to build one here? Yes, it is but when you Sysprep image you need different (little different approach). If you are involved in customizing Windows build, you reasonably would prefer to skip this section. In the Second portion, I’ll be discussing the Nutanix cmdlets and how to use it to pass answer file

1) Answer file for Sysprep image

This answer file differs in several ways, particularly around configuration passes.

To emphasize, Windows PE is not required at all since Windows Edition, Disk size, Partition is already there in Sysprep image

Windows PE Pass is blank
Windows PE Pass is blank

So in my answer file (above), you will see I have not configured anything. So allow me to move to the new section.

Pass 5 Specialize

Usually, in vCenter, while cloning VM, you specify VM Name and IP Address. While there are many other options available to customize, we don’t use them all in most of the cases. To give a unique name to the VM,  you need to use  Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup. As my screen capture below it is amd64_Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup_neutral

In Specialize Configuration Pass Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup-Netural is being configured
In Specialize Configuration Pass Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup-Neutral is being configured

Others settings in the specialize sections I have explained in the preceding posts. Therefore, I won’t repeat. Before I move to next pass, I would like to bring to your attention on configuring the default gateway. The default gateway configuration as per the Microsoft document and Help files doesn’t match. The default gateway is referred as Route in Microsoft reference material. In the previous post, I learned this, but I have not discussed it there. Please make a note of it. I have not come across a post/link which explains if this is accepted. I’m happy to be corrected.

Here is the post which gives me the hint how to use default gateway format. But I found that by accident while searching for another error. Reference Post -> http://www.korock.net/?p=62

Route Format/Default Gateway Format in Answer file
Route Format/Default Gateway Format in Answer file

Pass 7 oobe System

This pass is executed after the second and final reboot of Sysprep image. The first thing you must do is language selection as shown below.

"<yoastmark

Next important thing and it is where I struggled a bit using EULA selection. Unless you select true in HideEULAPage as shown below, it will keep popping up

EULA selection is required in OOBE section
EULA selection is required in OOBE section

I have not explained Other sections in this pass to avoid repetition. So this is all you have to do to create an answer file.

Here is the detailed answer file

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<unattend xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:unattend">
 <servicing></servicing>
 <settings pass="specialize">
 <component name="Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup" processorArchitecture="amd64" publicKeyToken="31bf3856ad364e35" language="neutral" versionScope="nonSxS" xmlns:wcm="http://schemas.microsoft.com/WMIConfig/2002/State" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
 <ComputerName>sss2017</ComputerName>
 <AutoLogon>
 <Password>
 <Value>VgBNAHcAYQByAGUAMQAhACoAKAAqAEAAUABhAHMAcwB3AG8AcgBkAA==</Value>
 <PlainText>false</PlainText>
 </Password>
 <LogonCount>1</LogonCount>
 <Username>preetam</Username>
 <Enabled>true</Enabled>
 <Domain>shsee.org</Domain>
 </AutoLogon>
 </component>
 <component name="Microsoft-Windows-ServerManager-SvrMgrNc" processorArchitecture="amd64" publicKeyToken="31bf3856ad364e35" language="neutral" versionScope="nonSxS" xmlns:wcm="http://schemas.microsoft.com/WMIConfig/2002/State" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
 <DoNotOpenServerManagerAtLogon>true</DoNotOpenServerManagerAtLogon>
 </component>
 <component name="Microsoft-Windows-TerminalServices-LocalSessionManager" processorArchitecture="amd64" publicKeyToken="31bf3856ad364e35" language="neutral" versionScope="nonSxS" xmlns:wcm="http://schemas.microsoft.com/WMIConfig/2002/State" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
 <fDenyTSConnections>false</fDenyTSConnections>
 </component>
 <component name="Networking-MPSSVC-Svc" processorArchitecture="amd64" publicKeyToken="31bf3856ad364e35" language="neutral" versionScope="nonSxS" xmlns:wcm="http://schemas.microsoft.com/WMIConfig/2002/State" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
 <DomainProfile_EnableFirewall>false</DomainProfile_EnableFirewall>
 <PrivateProfile_EnableFirewall>false</PrivateProfile_EnableFirewall>
 <PublicProfile_EnableFirewall>false</PublicProfile_EnableFirewall>
 </component>
 <component name="Microsoft-Windows-TCPIP" processorArchitecture="amd64" publicKeyToken="31bf3856ad364e35" language="neutral" versionScope="nonSxS" xmlns:wcm="http://schemas.microsoft.com/WMIConfig/2002/State" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
 <Interfaces>
 <Interface wcm:action="add">
 <Identifier>Ethernet</Identifier>
 <Ipv4Settings>
 <DhcpEnabled>false</DhcpEnabled>
 <RouterDiscoveryEnabled>true</RouterDiscoveryEnabled>
 <Metric>30</Metric>
 </Ipv4Settings>
 <UnicastIpAddresses>
 <IpAddress wcm:action="add" wcm:keyValue="1">192.168.1.235/24</IpAddress>
 </UnicastIpAddresses>
 <Routes>
 <Route wcm:action="add">
 <Identifier>10</Identifier>
 <Metric>20</Metric>
 <NextHopAddress>192.168.1.1</NextHopAddress>
 <Prefix>0.0.0.0/0</Prefix>
 </Route>
 </Routes>
 </Interface>
 </Interfaces>
 </component>
 <component name="Microsoft-Windows-DNS-Client" processorArchitecture="amd64" publicKeyToken="31bf3856ad364e35" language="neutral" versionScope="nonSxS" xmlns:wcm="http://schemas.microsoft.com/WMIConfig/2002/State" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
 <DNSSuffixSearchOrder>
 <DomainName wcm:action="add" wcm:keyValue="1">vzare.com</DomainName>
 </DNSSuffixSearchOrder>
 <Interfaces>
 <Interface wcm:action="add">
 <DNSServerSearchOrder>
 <IpAddress wcm:action="add" wcm:keyValue="1">192.168.1.110</IpAddress>
 </DNSServerSearchOrder>
 <Identifier>Ethernet</Identifier>
 <DisableDynamicUpdate>false</DisableDynamicUpdate>
 <DNSDomain>shsee.org</DNSDomain>
 <EnableAdapterDomainNameRegistration>true</EnableAdapterDomainNameRegistration>
 </Interface>
 </Interfaces>
 <DNSDomain>shsee.org</DNSDomain>
 </component>
 <component name="Microsoft-Windows-UnattendedJoin" processorArchitecture="amd64" publicKeyToken="31bf3856ad364e35" language="neutral" versionScope="nonSxS" xmlns:wcm="http://schemas.microsoft.com/WMIConfig/2002/State" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
 <Identification>
 <Credentials>
 <Domain>shsee.org</Domain>
 <Password>VMware1!</Password>
 <Username>preetam</Username>
 </Credentials>
 <JoinDomain>shsee.org</JoinDomain>
 </Identification>
 </component>
 </settings>
 <settings pass="oobeSystem">
 <component name="Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup" processorArchitecture="amd64" publicKeyToken="31bf3856ad364e35" language="neutral" versionScope="nonSxS" xmlns:wcm="http://schemas.microsoft.com/WMIConfig/2002/State" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
 <UserAccounts>
 <AdministratorPassword>
 <Value>VgBNAHcAYQByAGUAMQAhACoAKAAqAEAAQQBkAG0AaQBuAGkAcwB0AHIAYQB0AG8AcgBQAGEAcwBzAHcAbwByAGQA</Value>
 <PlainText>false</PlainText>
 </AdministratorPassword>
 <LocalAccounts>
 <LocalAccount wcm:action="add">
 <Password>
 <Value>VgBNAHcAYQByAGUAMQAhACoAKAAqAEAAUABhAHMAcwB3AG8AcgBkAA==</Value>
 <PlainText>false</PlainText>
 </Password>
 <Description>Local Admin Account</Description>
 <DisplayName>Super Admin Account</DisplayName>
 <Group>administrators</Group>
 <Name>super_07</Name>
 </LocalAccount>
 </LocalAccounts>
 </UserAccounts>
 <OOBE>
 <HideEULAPage>true</HideEULAPage>
 </OOBE>
 <FirstLogonCommands>
 <SynchronousCommand wcm:action="add">
 <CommandLine>%WINDIR%\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\PowerShell.exe -command Import-Module ServerManager; Add-WindowsFeature RSAT-Role-Tools; Add-WindowsFeature RSAT-DNS-Server; Add-WindowsFeature Telnet-Client</CommandLine>
 <Description>RSAT Tools</Description>
 <Order>1</Order>
 <RequiresUserInput>false</RequiresUserInput>
 </SynchronousCommand>
 </FirstLogonCommands>
 </component>
 <component name="Microsoft-Windows-International-Core" processorArchitecture="amd64" publicKeyToken="31bf3856ad364e35" language="neutral" versionScope="nonSxS" xmlns:wcm="http://schemas.microsoft.com/WMIConfig/2002/State" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
 <InputLocale>en-US</InputLocale>
 <SystemLocale>en-US</SystemLocale>
 <UILanguage>en-US</UILanguage>
 <UserLocale>en-US</UserLocale>
 </component>
 </settings>
 <cpi:offlineImage cpi:source="wim:c:/users/preetam/downloads/install.wim#Windows Server 2016 SERVERSTANDARD" xmlns:cpi="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:cpi" />
</unattend>

2) Nutanix PowerShell CMDlets

Before I discuss PowerShell provisioning method let me tell you there is another easy but slower approach to provision VM. Open prism portal, create VM and right at the bottom select checkbox and paste the answer file. It will work.

Create VM in AHV using Answer file and Sysprep Image
Create VM in AHV using Answer file and Sysprep Image

As I said, it is the traditional and less optimal method. Let me walk you through PowerShell script.

 
Add-PSSnapin -Name NutanixCmdletsPSSnapin
Connect-NTNXCluster -server 192.168.1.114 -UserName admin -AcceptInvalidSSLCerts -ForcedConnection
$VMNamestr=read-host "Enter the name of virtual machine"
$IP=read-host "Please enter IP for this Machine"
#casting into strings
$VMName=[string]$VMNamestr
$IPaddress=[string]$IP
$AnswerFile="C:\AHVAnswer\JustTry.xml"
$xml = New-Object XML
$xml.Load($AnswerFile)
$xml.unattend.settings[0].component[4].Interfaces.Interface.UnicastIpAddresses.IpAddress.'#text'=$IPaddress
$xml.unattend.settings[0].component[0].ComputerName=$VMName
$xml.Save($AnswerFile)
$sysprepdata=get-content $AnswerFile
$ws2016=Get-NTNXVM -VmId 0005470e-0be1-8f27-36dd-0050569dae35::9b277a60-b22b-4026-96a6-d617b7b9e01d
$custom = New-NTNXObject -Name VMCloneDTO
$VMCustomizationConfigDTO=New-NTNXObject -Name VMCustomizationConfigDTO
$VMCustomizationConfigDTO[1].freshInstall=$false
$VMCustomizationConfigDTO[1].userdata=$sysprepdata
$custom.vmCustomizationConfig=$VMCustomizationConfigDTO[1]
$spec = New-NTNXObject -Name VMCloneSpecDTO
$spec.name=$VMName
Clone-NTNXVirtualMachine -Vmid $ws2016.vmId -VmCustomizationConfig $custom.vmCustomizationConfig -SpecList $spec
Start-Sleep -Seconds 18
$VM2PowerOn=Get-NTNXVM | where{$_.vmname -eq $VMName}
Set-NTNXVMPowerOn -Vmid $VM2PowerOn.vmId
 
Unless I explain every line, I won’t be doing justice to this post.
To being with line 1, I’m loading Nutanix cmdlets.
In the second line, I’m connecting to Nutanix cluster
In the third and fourth line, I’m taking user inputs for username and IP Address for the VM
Line 6 and 7 I’m casting them into string
In the 8th line, I’m providing the answer file path
In 9th line, I have created XML object, following i.e. 10th line I have loaded the answer file
Line 11 and 12 are updating answer file with unique IP Address and VM name which was a user input in line 3 and 4
Finally, we save the changes made in XML in line 13
So far so good.
Now in line 14, we take the updated answer file in the variable.
Here we need to know how to take answer file into the variable and pass it to Clone-NTNXVirtualMachine command. Let’s work on it.
In line 15 is where the first NTNX cmdlet is used, I’m pulling vmId of the sysprep’ed image.
In line 16 we have to create VMCloneDTO object.
VMCloneDTO, VMCustomizationConfigDTO and VMCloneSpecDTO objects are necessary. Well, why?
VMCustomizationConfigDTO
VmCustomizationConfig parameter in Clone-NTNXVirtual machine (refer Line 23) needs VMCustomizationConfigDTO parameter. Given this fact you must create this object. When you create this object and explore the parameters of the object, you will see five attributes. I have illustrated below by mapping the parameters with GUI (Refer image above in case you are not able to co-relate the picture) parameters for easier understanding.
VMCustomizationConfigDTO object created to insert Answer file
VMCustomizationConfigDTO object created to insert Answer file

Now If you refer to line 18, where I’m declaring freshInstall as $false since this is not fresh but cloned image. Likewise, if you follow line 19, it is where I inserted the answer file into userdata. These two lines are all you need to update in VMCustomizationConfigDTO object.

VMCloneDTO

VMClone DTO is the parent object of VMCustomizationConfigDTO. So this object creation is next logical step. When you create this object and explore its parameter, you will discover there is a VMCustomizationConfig parameter. I have shown it below by using test object which you can match it with line 16.

image

Inputs which were pushed in line 18,19 needs to be updated in VMCustomizationConfigDTO. I have done it in line 20.

In line 21, I created VMCloneSpecDTO object. Primarily this object is used to name the VM which you can see in line 22; the input we received in line 3, which is later on passed into line 6.

Line 22 is the actual command we have to run to clone the VM. The great thing about the command is, it runs in seconds, unlike VMware template which is influenced by storage characteristics.

Line 23, 24 are the command used to power on the recently created Virtual machine.

Summary

All things considered now you can deploy, customize Windows 2016 server using Sysprep, Answer file and Powershell. We saw how Answer file gets pruned down when we use Sysprep image. Moreover, it also reduced deployment time. Ultimately Nutanix cmdlets come handy when cloning VM using the answer file.

[Nutanix] Install Windows 2016 on AHV using prism portal

 

I’m onboarding myself on two major technologies this year. 1) Windows 2016 and 2) Nutanix. You might have observed in the previous post I have already installed and configured ABS. So that Journey has already started. I initially hesitated but finally bought a 1 TB of SSD for T20 Dell server. By far it is not a requirement, but since AOS 5.0 is released and tons of feature it has brought it I felt, worth the AED.

As the release of AOS 5.0 has coincided With Windows 2016 released. I thought it is worth covering Windows 2016 Step-by-Step post. As a first step, you need a Windows 2016 image. Click here to download the ISO.

To upload image in AHV, login to prism portal https://clusteripaddress

You can upload raw,qcow2, ISO,vmdk,vhd and vdi files

A) To upload Windows 2016 ISO, click on the gear icon and then select Image Configuration.

Image Configuration Page in Nutanix Prism Portal
Image Configuration Page in Nutanix Prism Portal

In the Image Configuration Window, click Upload Image which opens up another Create Image Window. You should distinct Image Name, Annotation (optional) description of an OS and then select Image Type. Choosing Image Type is also optional.

Create Image Window in Nutanix Prism Portal
Create Image Window in Nutanix Prism Portal

I have a single Storage container, so nothing for me to select. In Image source you have URL. Don’t confuse URL with Http. It can be NFS as well e.g. NFS://hostname or IPAddress. I have instead uploaded an ISO using Choose File option.

ISO File is being uploaded to Nutanix CVM
ISO File is being uploaded to Nutanix CVM

ISO File quickly gets uploaded progress you can watch. After ISO is uploaded, you get cute message then one I have captured below

ISO File is successfully uploaded
ISO File is successfully uploaded

You have to repeat the same procedure to upload VirtIO drivers. For this post, I have downloaded the drivers from Fedora, but I must give credit to Artur as he has posted it in his blog post. Please note the sequence in which IDE must be attached. Thanks Artur

VirtIO drivers are required for all Windows build as VirtIO SCSI driver are not part of Windows build

Building Windows 2016

From the home drop down select VM, which takes it to VM page, Click on Create VM as captured below

 

Create VM drop down menu
Create VM drop down menu
Create VM screen
Create VM screen

 

Create VM click opens up Create VM page. Fill details of VM

  1. Name of the VM
  2. Description of the VM
  3. Compute specifications (vCPU, Memory)
Create VM Specification Compute, Storage and Networking
Create VM Specification Compute, Storage and Networking

In the Disks section by default, CDROM is empty. First attach VirtIO ISO, followed by Windows 2016 ISO and finally OS drive. I have kept disk size of 40 GB.

Create VM Specification Compute, Storage and Networking -Part02
Create VM Specification Compute, Storage and Networking -Part02
Select ISO Image e.g. VirtIO Driver, ISO File of Operating System
Select ISO Image e.g. VirtIO Driver, ISO File of Operating System

 

You can see the number of BUS Type available which I have captured in the below screen. 99% of the time we select SCSI.

Select SCSI Controller for the VM
Select SCSI Controller for the VM

 

Select Disk Size for the VM
Select Disk Size for the VM

Below I have ensured that I have followed the recommended sequence

Screen which depicts the order in which ISO and Disk must be attached
Screen which depicts the order in which ISO and Disk must be attached

To Add Network adapter for this VM, I have clicked Add new NIC. In new NIC, I selected the VLAN name where this VM will be attached

 

Select the portgroup for VM
Select the portgroup for VM
Finally to create VM click Save Button
Finally to create VM click Save Button

 

After VM is configured, Power ON the VM

Power ON just created VM
Power ON just created VM

At this stage, you must select the SCSI driver. I kept missing this step and end up spending time googling.

Select SCSI driver for Windows 2016 Server from VirtIO ISO
Select SCSI driver for Windows 2016 Server from VirtIO ISO

Even though we are installing Windows 2016, I have selected Windows 10. Post that you will be presented with below screen in which you must choose the driver.

Select SCSI driver for Windows 2016 Server from VirtIO ISO -Part02
Select SCSI driver for Windows 2016 Server from VirtIO ISO -Part02

After OS is installed, you have to deploy NGT tools without which Network card will not be detected.

Install Nutanix Guest Tools (NGT)
Install Nutanix Guest Tools (NGT)

Finally, you must review if VirtIO drivers are installed correctly. For this check device manager and expand the section captured below

Verify Drivers are installed in Window Server 2016
Verify Drivers are installed in Window Server 2016

Physical server image level backup using vembu

Physical server Image level backup is also possible in Vembu BDR suite. It is the exclusive feature in comparison with other backup products. In cloud era do we need a solution for physical servers? My answer is 200% Yes. The fact that green field is 100% virtual is a reality on the one hand, but on another hand, it is only 10-20% of the complete story. Most of the IT infrastructure is a brown field. It is the mix of physical servers and virtual servers. So far all products which focus on virtualization of the backup product has failed or had the biggest hinder in deciding it.
You do not believe me? Ok, check Veeam they have started with introducing backup agent for the physical server, but it was free of cost and support on best effort basis. The demand for the solution for physical server back was so high that they have to introduce this feature.

Vembu is the 360-degree solution for your backup. It offers Virtual machine image level backup based on Hyper-V and VMware. It provides agent level back up for KVM.

There is no image level backup solution for any KVM-based hypervisor yet. And there is a reason for it. Till the date, KVM does not have CBT (Changed Block Tracking) feature available. Without CBT, image level backup is like copying same 100 GB file VM file daily which means no optimization, no de-depude as a result more backup window. So it is not a backup vendor but KVM contributors who have to explore this area. But this has not stopped business from adopting KVM. The KVM based Hypervisor is getting popular and will continue to become more mature. When I read this article (by Alastair Cooke @DemitasseNZ)it is evident VMware is now focusing on VSAN and NSX, vSphere is the 3rd priority. So it gives the huge opportunity for the KVM-based hypervisor to have parity feature with vSphere.

How does Vembu help KVM-based hypervisor platform?

Vembu has developed its CBT driver (Windows Hardware Signed) Agent who offers more or less similar benefits as you would get image level backup solution available on Hyper-V and VMware. CBT Driver is solely dependent on VSS. Without VSS driver it will be futile.

Vembu not only offers the solution for Windows and Linux but also for MAC OS. They have the desktop level backup solution for Windows and MAC. I hope my argument on 360-degree backup solution covering every aspect of the datacenter is justified. Ok, below is picture worth 10,000

image

Here, I will be walking through on how to do the backup Physical server using Vembu. Let me first tell you it is straightforward. It is not something way different, but we must know how to do it. To take an image level backup of Windows server, you have to install agent “Vembu ImageBackup.”  This agent is single executable file applicable to all Windows server platform beginning from 2003 SP2 to 2012 R2 and Hopefully very soon 2016 and as well as Windows Desktops Platform Windows XP SP2 to Windows 10.

Installation & Configuration of Agent

After you have downloaded the executable, following the installation steps.

image  image image image image image

Browser will automatically point to localhost:4545 image

 

Select the time zone

image

Enter IP Address/FQDN of Vembu Backup Server

image

Next screen you are warned that post installation of driver server will reboot.

image

Select the disk to protect. By default, system disk is selected.

image

Configure the schedule for backup. Since I’m setting weekly backup, I have to choose GFS retention which ensures backup are merged at least once in a month.

image  image

Finally, review the backup job settings; provide a suitable name for the job. As observed in other Job types,  we also have here the option to run the back immediately after creating the Job.

image

Backup Time

On 1 Gbps LAN, it took 3 hours to backup of 339 GB of data.

image

Nutanix acropolis block services–part03

In this post (Part:03) I’m covering how to configure Nutanix Acropolis Block Services (ABS). Before I start I would like to recap what was covered in Part01 and Part02.

In Part01, I covered the basics of ABS, notably new terminology, and its benefits over the previously introduced iSCSI services. I also took the opportunity to discuss in detail the use cases, especially Oracle database support.

In Part02, I discussed various considerations illustrating design considerations, especially CVM Failure scenario.

“In summary Part01 & Part02 are great to read about, but how do I actually get started fiddling around with this for myself?”

It is the main goal of this “How to post”, it is a long post. I will first configure iSCSI initiator. For iSCSI initiator, I’m using Windows 2012 R2. In case you wish to know Linux part refer official guide from Nutanix. Continue reading Nutanix acropolis block services–part03

Replication using vembu

As promised here is the post which covers replication feature of Vembu. If you have gone through host based replication feature of VMware you may not find some difference. Considering the fact that both tool does the same but Vembu is product which is backup plus DR and hence is referred Vembu Backup Disaster Recovery Suite (BDR).  Why do you replication? Isn’t backup data sufficient to recover. In most cases this is old school. In today’s cloud world SMB and enterprises are looking forward to storing their data in DR site, public cloud or offsite which is more appropriate word. Continue reading Replication using vembu

Configuring Vembu Backup on Hyper-V

I’m starting today series of posts focusing solely on backing up VMs hosted on Hyper-V.  In these posts, I will cover the unique configurations of Hyper-V and Vembu BDR. There are striking differences in the configuration steps which I considered worth covering in these posts. Continue reading Configuring Vembu Backup on Hyper-V

Two Weeks in 2017

Two weeks have passed like a flash, and I could sense things are flooding be information or for that matter work. I want to blog about Nutanix. But no time so far. I finished two posts on Nutanix Block Service here and here. I have yet to complete 3rd part. I’m hoping to finish it before next week. As I’m on Nutanix, I’m extremely glad to be considered as Nutanix Technology Champion 2017

NTC-2017
NTC-2017

Continue reading Two Weeks in 2017

Recovering Data and VM Using Vembu

So far I have covered how to take backup of Files, Virtual Machines, and multiple methods to protect the data. Today I will demonstrate restoration process to restore Virtual machines. Recovering data in Vembu is simplified. It is few steps I had to perform.

Restore Option

I noticed there are several options to restore which is seen below.

Restoration Options in Vembu
Restoration Options in Vembu

Continue reading Recovering Data and VM Using Vembu

Data Protection Approach -HealthCare

There is a growing trend in using Electronic Medical Records in all advanced hospitals. EMR has provided tremendous advantages in keep track of patient health records. As technology has advanced so is the threat to exploit this highly sensitive data has grown exponentially. Data breaches in Healthcare industry has seen steep growth. To protect highly sensitive data traditional approach is not sufficient. Defense in depth approach is essential to protect against data breaches, as each layer offer unique protection mechanism. Continue reading Data Protection Approach -HealthCare

NUTANIX ACROPOLIS BLOCK SERVICES – PART02

I hope you had a chance to review Acropolis Block Services Introduction covered in Part-01 of this series. If not, please consider it as it is the foundation of Part-02 i.e. this post. In this post, I will explain pre-requisites, Terminology, and some considerations to keep in mind.

Prerequisites

  1. Ports 3260 and 3205 are opened between iSCSI Initiator and iSCSI Target
  2. IP Address for iSCSI Target. By the way, Acropolis Block Services (ABS) refers this IP Address as External Data services IP Address
  3. AOS is 4.7 & Above
  4. iSCSI Initiator Name is also known as IQN (iSCSI Qualified Name)
  5. Volume Group

Continue reading NUTANIX ACROPOLIS BLOCK SERVICES – PART02

Distrupting Datacenter