Tag Archives: vRAM

Ways To Extending a vRAM Pool

You can extend a vRAM pool of a certain license edition in three ways.

1.Assign new license keys of the same edition to unlicensed ESXi 5.0 hosts.

For example, the total amount of memory that you provision on the powered-on virtual machines on ESXi 5.0 hosts that are licensed with vSphere Standard reaches the maximum amount of pooled vRAM for vSphere Standard. To increase the vRAM pool for vSphere Standard, you assign another license key of vSphere Standard to an unlicensed ESXi 5.0 host.

2.Combine a license key of the same edition

You can combine the capacities only of license keys that are of the same vSphere 5.0 edition.

For example, suppose that you license a group of ESXi 5.0 hosts with license key A of vSphere Standard. License key A has a capacity of 10 processors and adds 320GB of vRAM to the pool for vSphere Standard. The amount of consumed vRAM for vSphere standard reaches 320GB. You purchase license key B of vSphere Standard that has a capacity of 5 processors corresponding to a vRAM entitlement of 160GB. You use the VMware Licensing Portal to combine the capacities of license key A and B to create license key C of vSphere Standard that has a capacity of 15 processors. You remove license key A from the ESXi 5.0 hosts and assign them the new license key C. Respectively, the vRAM pool for vSphere Standard is extended to 480GB.

3.Upgrade the editions of the license keys that are assigned to ESXi 5.0 hosts.

For example, you can upgrade the license keys from vSphere Standard to vSphere Enterprise. License keys of vSphere Enterprise entitle 64GB of vRAM for the processor capacity of the license key.

If you license vCenter Server with a vCenter Server Essentials license key, you must consider the following limitations.

  • You cannot power on a virtual machine through a direct connection to an ESXi host.
  • You cannot hot add memory to a virtual machine through a direct connection to its ESXi host.
  • For powered-on virtual machines on the hosts that vCenter Server manages, you cannot configure more memory than the vRAM that is provided by the host license keys.

Consumed vRAM

The consumed vRAM is equal to the total amount of memory that is provisioned on powered-on virtual machines.

For example, suppose that the vRAM pool for vSphere Standard contains 320GB of vRAM. On the ESXi 5.0 hosts that are licensed with vSphere Standard, you create and power on 50 virtual machines each with 4GB of configured memory. The total amount of memory that is provisioned on the new virtual machines is 200GB, and the amount of vRAM that is consumed from the vRAM pool for vSphere Standard is 200GB.

Soft enforcing exists on how vRAM is consumed across virtual machines that run on ESXi 5.0 hosts. The amount of vRAM that you use for powered-on virtual machines on an ESXi 5.0 host can exceed the vRAM entitlement of the vSphere 5.0 licenses key that is assigned to the host. Till the total amount of vRAM that you use for virtual machines is equal or less then the maximum amount of pooled vRAM for a license edition, ESXi 5.0 hosts are in compliance.

For example, suppose that the pool for vSphere Enterprise contains 300GB of vRAM. You provision 340GB of memory for the powered-on virtual machines that run on ESXi 5.0 hosts that are licensed with vSphere Enterprise. As a result, the consumed vRAM for the powered-on virtual machines is 340GB and the vRAM pool for vSphere Enterprise is out of compliance.

An alarm triggers on vCenter Server when the amount of vRAM that powered-on virtual machines consume exceeds the pooled vRAM for a vSphere license edition. See the figure below

To avoid exceeding the maximum amount of pooled vRAM for a vSphere license edition, you can use the license reporting function in vCenter Server to track the license use of vSphere 5.0 products. Using the license reporting function in vCenter Server, you can also set custom thresholds to receive notifications when the consumed vRAM for a vSphere 5.0 product exceeds a certain limit as shown below

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vRAM–Part02

You should plan to avoid exceeding the license capacity for products with soft-enforced licenses. To avoid exceeding the license capacity for products with soft-enforced licenses, you can use the license reporting function in vCenter Server to monitor the license use for products. The license reporting function also allows you to set custom thresholds to trigger notifications when the license use for a product exceeds a certain limit.

 

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vRAM Entitlement and Pooling

Every license edition of vSphere 5.0 entitles a certain amount of vRAM.

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* Note: this limit is GB of physical RAM per physical server

vRAM vRAM is a licensing-specific measure for the memory that is configured for powered-on virtual machines that run on ESXi 5.0 hosts. vSphere 5.0 license keys have per-processor capacity with pooled vRAM entitlements. When you assign a vSphere 5.0 license key of a certain edition to an ESXi 5.0 host, the key adds a certain amount of vRAM to a vRAM pool that is created for the corresponding license edition.

For example, if you license an ESXi 5.0 host with vSphere Standard, a vRAM pool for vSphere Standard is created.

The amount of vRAM that a vSphere 5.0 key adds to a vRAM pool is equal to the processor capacity of the license key multiplied by the vRAM entitlement for license edition.

For example, if you license an ESXi 5.0 host with vSphere Standard key for five processors and 32GB of entitled vRAM, the amount vRAM that the key adds to the pool for vSphere Standard is 160GB. (5 processor X 32 GB RAM = 160)

For example, if you power on a new virtual machine on an ESXi 5.0 host that is licensed with vSphere Standard and configure 6GB of memory to the machine, 6GB of vRAM is consumed from the vRAM pool for vSphere Standard.

A vRAM pool aggregates all vRAM entitlements of vSphere 5.0 license keys of one edition that are assigned to ESXi 5.0 hosts. A vRAM pool for one license edition is available for one vCenter Server or a Linked Mode group. The amount of vRAM that is available in a vRAM pool for a license edition determines the total amount of memory that you can provision on powered-on virtual machines running on ESXi 5.0 hosts.

For example, you assign license key A of vSphere Standard to an ESXi 5.0 host. The key has a capacity of six processors and entitles 32GB of vRAM. The vRAM pool that is created for vSphere Standard contains 192GB (32 X 6 Processor) of vRAM that license key A provides. Later, you assign license key B of vSphere Standard to another ESXi 5.0 host. License key B has a capacity for 10 processors and entitles 32GB of vRAM. License key B adds 320GB (32 X 10) of vRAM to the vRAM pool for vSphere Standard. The total amount of vRAM that is available in the vRAM pool for vSphere Standard is the sum from the vRAM entitlements of license key A and license key B, that is 512GB (320 + 192) . In this example, you can provision up to 512GB of memory on the virtual machines that run on the ESXi 5.0 hosts that are licensed with vSphere Standard license keys.

If you assign vSphere 5.0 license keys of different editions to ESXi 5.0 hosts, a separate vRAM pool is created for every license edition.

For example, suppose that you assign vSphere Enterprise to a certain group of ESXi 5.0 hosts and vSphere Standard to another group of ESXi 5.0 hosts. As a result, two vRAM pools are created, one for vSphere Standard and another for vSphere Enterprise.