vCloud Automation Center 6.0 and vCenter Orchestrator Advance Automation -Part01

This post is about extending vCAC in-built workflows. In last two post (Post1, Post2) I used vCenter Orchestrator (vCO) workflows and executed them using vCloud Automation Center’s (vCAC) advance service designer. It was like taking vCAC as front end to execute those workflows without taking any benefits of vCloud Automation Center’s product. vCAC was purely acting as front end.

Advance service designer doesn’t follow any reservation, policies configured for a particular tenant. It is purely taking inputs from whatever is configured in vCenter Orchestrator workflow and executing it. As I think of it is of help but then I miss all configuration, tracking ownership, multi-tenancy and metering in built in vCAC. In order to cover this I need to do additional scripting which is referred as day-2 operation. To cater this problem, vCAC provides you a way where you can modify in-built workflows. Basic details are provided into this document. I won’t repeat it here. But in order to understand this post you must read it.

To extend workflow you need vCAC designer. It is part of vCAC and can be downloaded from https://vCACAppliance.hostname.com:5480/installer/. Install it. (it is next-next-next-Finish thing).

Problem Statement

User should be able to provision VM by selecting VM size within vCAC interface. Users should be able to understand what compute, storage details are provisioned when they select VM Size.

Here I’m going to modify my existing workflow which I created in post here. If you see the workflow there are three inputs needed

1. VM name

2. VM size

3. IP Address for the VM

If you review this post, 3rd point is automatically taken care. So I have to just focus on how to take two input (VM Name and VM Size) from vCAC and put in the vCO workflow. It was bit simple, just two inputs.

Cloning part will be taken care by vCAC but post provisioning task will be taken care by vCO workflow. So we need to only focus on creating a vCO workflow which will do the following

  1. Changing CPU count
  2. Change RAM
  3. Add Disk
  4. Add Backup Network if selected

If you execute this workflow from vCO or vCenter  VC:VirtualMachine as input is needed. But vCAC do not understand VC:VirtualMachine, it can only understand string input or can provide string output.  VC:VirtualMachine input is referred as complex object type. In order to deal with this input we need to put a wrapper around the workflow. How to put a wrapper around a workflow is explained by VCOTEAM.INFO. Thanks to this post. It is key post.

That post is a where you can start but that isn’t sufficient. You need more. If you refer below return type is array.

image

We need a VC:VirtualMachine as return type. I added script section and then I have created a new parameter with VC:VirtualMachine type with name as vm01 (referred in below screen)

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In the first line of the script I converted array type i.e. Array/VC:VirtualMachine into VC:VirtualMachine and sent that as output. This is the core piece. If you understood this, you don’t need worry further. Everything else is straight forward. I thought so Winking smile

When I executed the VCO workflow from vCAC, it failed twice. First it failed with VMware tools not working and second time it failed with error “Hot add functionality” is disabled in VM.

First problem was when the provisioning activity was completed, my next workflow which was to shutdown the VM graceful was looking for VMware tools, it didn’t found vmware tools and abruptly failed. In order to shutdown VM gracefully VMware tools must be ready. So to address first problem I have to find a workflow which will check if VMware tools are ready. This can be easily checked by using “vim3WaitToolsStarted” action element. This workflow waits for VMware tools to be ready, as it is need to graceful shutdown VM.

Second problem was workflow didn’t wait for another workflow to be completed. After I shutdown VMs I have workflow which will change CPU count, then change RAM, Add Disk and finally powered ON the VM. So powered ON workflow didn’t wait to execute CPU count, Add Disk and RAM change workflow.  Therefore I use to get error about Hotplug not supported. It was like VM was started before even CPU and RAM change could be executed. So to solve this problem I added “vim3WaitTaskEnd” in-built workflow. This workflow checks previous tasks before executing next task.

With this additional work my final workflow was ready and shown below

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NB: Except for the script section, everything in vCenter Orchestrator is in-built

Now next part is how to make vCAC to pick this VCO. I have discussed in next post here

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